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Testosterone replacement therapy online options

Written by Leann Poston, M.D.

After the age of 30, men have a natural decline in testosterone levels of about 1% per year. In many men, symptoms such as low energy, decreased muscle strength, and decreased libido will result from low-T. For the last decade or so, interest in testosterone supplementation has increased. Clinical trials to evaluate the benefits of testosterone supplementation for men have concluded that testosterone supplementation does work in appropriately selected men. They describe the benefits as moderate. These findings may lead many men to look for an online doctor who will write a prescription for testosterone replacement therapy. In this article, we will look at the many forms of testosterone offered online and the risks and benefits of each.

In early 2000, direct marketing to consumers led to a boom in testosterone sales. It became a billion-dollar industry. Do all men after a certain age need testosterone replacement therapy? According to urologist Dr. Landon Trost, the answer is no. Testosterone replacement therapy should be considered in men who have a blood testosterone level of less than 280. He cautions that studies show that supplementing with testosterone when you have a normal level brings no added benefit.

Read More: Online Testosterone Replacement Treatment and Programs

Online testosterone replacement therapy requires a prescription from a doctor

Forms of Testosterone Replacement Therapy Available Online

Gels

Testosterone gels are a prescription testosterone replacement therapy that can be purchased online. Testosterone gels are absorbed through the skin. The brand choice will determine where the preferred application site is. AndroGel, Testim, and Vogelxo are applied to the upper arm or shoulder. Fortesta is applied to the front or inner thigh.

Testosterone gels are usually applied in the morning to clean, dry skin. Cover the application site with clothing as soon as the gel has dried to prevent accidental transfer. Wash your hands with soap and water after applying the gel to prevent accidental transfer. Do not apply testosterone gel directly to the penis or scrotum or to any skin surface that is cracked or covered with a rash or sores. Do not get testosterone cream in the eyes.

Black Box Warning: Testosterone gels can be inadvertently transferred to others, such as women or children, causing serious health problems. If a woman is pregnant, may be pregnant, or is breastfeeding touches testosterone gel, her baby may be harmed. Care must be taken to protect others from exposure to testosterone gels and cream. Bed linens and towels may also have testosterone gel on them. Advise anyone who touches items which may have testosterone gel on them to wash their hands carefully with soap and water.

Testosterone gels and creams may potentially cause:

  • watery eyes
  • headaches
  • dry or itchy skin
  • diarrhea
  • skin redness or irritation

Potential side-effects from testosterone replacement therapy:

  • enlarged or tender breasts
  • acne
  • depression
  • headaches
  • a blood clot which may cause lower leg pain or swelling or shortness of breath
  • stroke symptoms
  • prolonged erections
  • chest pain
  • nausea and vomiting
  • worsening of sleep apnea

Keep testosterone gel in its original container and away from children. Testosterone gel should be stored at room temperature, away from heat and moisture. If you purchase testosterone replacement therapy online, follow your doctor’s instructions for dosage and application.

Patch

Androderm is a patch that contains testosterone. It is applied to the thigh or torso each night. The application site should not be oily, hairy, likely to perspire heavily, over a bone, or to have pressure directly on it such as when sitting or sleeping. A different spot should be chosen each night for application. A minimum of seven days should pass before a spot is reused.

Use the testosterone patch immediately after opening the pouch. Testosterone patches work best if they are applied at the same time each night, usually between 8:00 p.m. and midnight, and left in place for 24 hours. Only one patch should be applied at a time unless prescribed differently by your physician.

After you have applied the patch, do not shower, bathe, swim, or get the patch wet for a minimum of three hours. Do not remove the testosterone patch until ready to apply the next one. If a patch loosens, press it firmly to better adhere to the skin. Do not tape it in place. If a patch falls off before noon, replace it. If the patch falls off after noon, replace it at the normally scheduled time.

Side effects from testosterone patches may include:

  • burn-like blisters, redness, pain, or itching at the application site

Potential side-effects from testosterone replacement therapy:

  • enlarged or tender breasts
  • acne
  • depression
  • headaches
  • a blood clot which may cause lower leg pain or swelling or shortness of breath
  • stroke symptoms
  • prolonged erections
  • chest pain
  • nausea and vomiting
  • worsening of sleep apnea

If you purchase testosterone replacement therapy online inform your doctor of any new or worsening symptoms you may notice (Medline Plus, 2018).

Gum and cheek (buccal)

A putty-like form of testosterone that comes as a tablet-shaped patch can be applied to the crevice between your upper lip and gum to deliver testosterone through the mucosa lining the mouth. The patches are applied above the right and left incisors and on alternating sides. The patches only work when applied to the upper gums. Though the patches look like tablets do not chew or swallow them.

Testosterone buccal is usually applied every 12 hours or as directed by your health care provider. Do not apply testosterone buccal more or less often than it is prescribed.

Chewing gum, smoking, brushing your teeth and drinking beverages can all be done with a testosterone buccal patch in place. Take care that the patch is not dislodged from your gum. If the patch falls off less than eight hours after application, reapply it and follow your normal application schedule. If the patch falls off after it has been in place for over eight hours, reapply it and count it as the next scheduled dose.

Testosterone in a buccal form can cause the following side effects:

  • irritation, redness, pain, tenderness, swelling, toughening, or blistering of gums
  • swollen or tender lips
  • unpleasant or bitter taste in the mouth
  • impaired ability to taste foods

Potential side-effects of testosterone replacement therapy:

  • enlarged or tender breasts
  • acne
  • depression
  • headaches
  • a blood clot which may cause lower leg pain or swelling or shortness of breath
  • stroke symptoms
  • prolonged erections
  • chest pain
  • nausea and vomiting
  • worsening of sleep apnea

Keep all testosterone replacement therapy away from children and pets. Keep testosterone buccal in its original container stored at room temperature away from heat and moisture (Medline Plus, 2018).

Nasal

Natasto is a testosterone replacement therapy that can be purchased online from a pharmacy and is available in a gel form. The gel is applied to the inside of the nose using a dispenser pump. The doses should be spaced by six to eight hours as instructed by your health care provider. Do not apply more or less that the amount prescribed. If you have severe cold symptoms, contact your doctor for instructions.

Testosterone nasal gels may cause the following side effects:

Specific to testosterone nasal gel:

  • headache
  • cough
  • sinus pain
  • changed sense of smell

Potential side-effects of testosterone replacement therapy:

  • enlarged or tender breasts
  • acne
  • depression
  • headaches
  • a blood clot which may cause lower leg pain or swelling or shortness of breath
  • stroke symptoms
  • prolonged erections
  • chest pain
  • nausea and vomiting
  • worsening of sleep apnea

Consult your health care provider if you have any worsening or new symptoms and for instructions on how to use your medication when you have cold symptoms. Keep your testosterone nasal gel in its original container, tightly closed, and away from children. Store it in a room temperature setting away from heat and moisture (Medline Plus, 2017)

Implantable pellets

Testopel is a brand of testosterone containing pellets that are surgically implanted under the skin every three to six months. Testopel pellets are implanted by your health care provider and therefore are not really an online prescription option for testosterone replacement therapy. There is the risk of infection at the implantation site and the risk that the pellet can work its way out of the skin.

Implanting testosterone pellets makes it much more difficult to adjust testosterone dosage than when using testosterone injections.

Injections

Testosterone injections come as testosterone cypionate (Depo-Testosterone), testosterone enanthate (Xyostad), and testosterone undecanoate (Aveed).

Warning: Testosterone undecanoate has a warning that it can cause serious breathing problems or allergic reactions. For this reason, it is recommended that the injection of testosterone undecanoate take place in a health care setting. Testosterone enanthate and other testosterone products can cause an increase in blood pressure, which can increase the risk for a stroke or heart attack.

Testosterone injections came as a liquid that is injected into the muscle. Testosterone enanthate can also be injected subcutaneously (just under the skin).

Side effects of testosterone injections may include:

  • pain, redness, bruising, bleeding or hardness at the injection site

Potential side-effects of testosterone replacement therapy:

  • enlarged or tender breasts
  • acne
  • depression
  • headaches
  • a blood clot which may cause lower leg pain or swelling or shortness of breath
  • stroke symptoms
  • prolonged erections
  • chest pain
  • nausea and vomiting
  • worsening of sleep apnea (Medline Plus, 2019).

Finding a doctor and getting a prescription for testosterone replacement therapy online

Invigor Medical has board-certified doctors who are licensed in your state available for online telemedicine consultation to help you determine whether you are a candidate for receiving an online prescription for testosterone replacement therapy. If you are, they will send a prescription to our U.S.-based, licensed compounding pharmacy, Olympia Compounding Pharmacy.

After completing a series of blood tests to determine where your hormone levels currently are, the Invigor Medical physician will evaluate your symptoms to see if they are consistent with low-T. If they are, you may receive a prescription from the online doctor for Depo-testosterone, a testosterone replacement therapy.

Depo-testosterone or testosterone cypionate is an oil-based testosterone ester. A Depo-testosterone injection is available in two strengths, 100 mg/ml and 200 mg/ml. A dosage of 50-400 mg is administered every two to four weeks. Vials of Depo-testosterone should be stored at room temperature and protected from light. Like all medications, Depo-testosterone has side-effects. Ensure that you know the potential risks and benefits of all medications. Contraindications to using Depo-Testosterone include known hypersensitivity to the medication, breast cancer, prostate cancer, or serious heart, liver, or kidney disease.

Conclusion

Interest in testosterone replacement therapies has increased, leading to more clinical trials to assess their level of benefit for men who have declining testosterone levels due to aging. Testosterone injections have been an option for decades and are felt to be a safe, effective testosterone replacement therapy method.

For more information, visit Invigor Medical at https://invigormedical.com

Read More: How to Buy Testosterone Injections Online for Low-T

DISCLAIMER

While we strive to always provide accurate, current, and safe advice in all of our articles and guides, it’s important to stress that they are no substitute for medical advice from a doctor or healthcare provider.  You should always consult a practicing professional who can diagnose your specific case.  The content we’ve included in this guide is merely meant to be informational and does not constitute medical advice. 

References:

  1. Mayo Clinic. (2017). Testosterone Therapy: Mayo Clinic Radio [Video]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOtv4zIaN88
  2. Miller, E. (2020). Testosterone Therapy. Drugwatch. https://www.drugwatch.com/testosterone/
  3. Medline Plus. (2018). Testosterone Transdermal Patches. Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a601118.html
  4. Medline Plus. (2017). Testosterone Nasal Gel. Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a615025.html
  5. Medline Plus. (2018). Testosterone Topical. Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a605020.html
  6. Medline Plus. (2018). testosterone Buccal. Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a603034.html
  7. Medline Plus. (2019). Testosterone Injection. Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a614041.html